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PSCA Launches Innovative New Education Program, Credential for Plan Sponsors

Today the Plan Sponsor Council of America (PSCA), part of the American Retirement Association (ARA), launches a new and innovative education program and credential: the Certified Plan Sponsor Professional (CPSP).

Developed by plan sponsors in collaboration with education experts at ARA and some of the nation’s leading retirement plan experts, the CPSP credential demonstrates a level of expertise in the duties of a retirement plan sponsor, and attests that the holder possesses the knowledge and skills to evaluate, design, implement and manage an employer-sponsored retirement plan. Better still – thanks to the generous support of education partners Ascensus, Franklin Templeton, OppenheimerFunds, PIMCO and Wilmington Trust – the program is available at no cost for plan sponsors.

The rigorous online credentialing exam is supported by a three-course, nine-module education program that incorporates the latest in adult learning technology and encompasses key subject matters, including:

  • Considerations for Retirement Plan Design
  • The Most Popular DC Plan: The 401(k)
  • Other Employer-Sponsored Retirement Plans
  • Plan Fiduciary Obligations and Risk Management
  • Investment Concepts
  • Behavioral Finance and Employee Engagement
  • Vendor Management and Selection
  • Plan Operations
  • Plan Audits and Compliance

To be eligible for the CPSP credential, a candidate must have at least two years of experience in a retirement plan sponsor or related role, pass the CPSP credentialing exam, and ascribe and adhere to the Code of Conduct adopted by PSCA.

We’ll be making further announcements – and showcasing the CPSP education program at the opening session – and at the NAPA booth – at the NAPA 401(k) Summit on April 7.

More information about the CPSP education program and credential is available at pscalearn.org

All comments
Karl Muller
2 months 2 weeks ago

April Fools...right? It just got published a day late? It has to be.